Branding

How to Become a Thought Leader in 60 Minutes or Less

How to Become a Thought Leader in 60 Minutes or Less

Once a subject matter expert becomes a recognized thought leader, the time commitment required to engage in content development will be better understood and more highly valued. As opportunities flow in as the result of a coordinated thought leadership campaign, the return will become self-evident. But early on, busy lawyers and like professionals struggle with carving out time to create content. What if I told you that you only needed to carve out 60 minutes or less every six to eight weeks in order to establish a well-oiled marketing machine?

The Sales and Marketing Conundrum for Professional Services Firms

The Sales and Marketing Conundrum for Professional Services Firms

There is a danger in conflating sales with marketing, or considering them the same function, when really they are distinct activities and requisite skill sets. But there is an equal danger in keeping the functions entirely separate, which is often where both programs (sales and marketing) come up short, with departments at large companies pointing figures and making excuses.

Embrace the Power of Video to Build Your Firm’s Brand

Embrace the Power of Video to Build Your Firm’s Brand

You’ve read the articles. You’ve heard the marketing strategists. And, yes, you’ve undoubtedly seen the videos extolling the virtues of video marketing. Add our voice to the chorus: Video should definitely be part of your professional services’ firm’s marketing mix. Why? Here are a few compelling reasons why video is critical to reaching your audience and growing your firm’s brand.

Want to Generate More Leads as a Lawyer? Write a Book

Want to Generate More Leads as a Lawyer? Write a Book

This post originally appeared on Attorney at Work.

If you are an established lawyer looking to grow your practice, or a young lawyer hoping to build a book of business for the long term, you should give serious consideration to writing a book. Why? There are few, if any, better marketing assets than a book with your name on the cover.

As a lawyer, there are two steps to business development. First, you need to generate opportunities, then you need to capitalize on them. Writing a book helps with both. Here’s how.

The Right-Brained Lawyer is the Lawyer of the Future

The Right-Brained Lawyer is the Lawyer of the Future

At the leading edge of each of each new technology—from the Internet, to blockchain, to artificial intelligence—a pattern repeats itself. Every “next big thing” is over-hyped and oversold. A wave of momentum builds, companies and capital plunge in, the wave crashes, and a few participants emerge to define the market moving forward. Many technologies eventually become “big things,” but often not in ways we originally envision.

One thing we can say for certain—because we’re witnessing it before our eyes—is that the aggregate effect of technological advancements over the last twenty years is the leveling of the playing field when it comes to availability of information. We have moved from a world of information asymmetry to one of information parity due to the digitization of data accessible at the click of a button. In this word, yesterday’s “experts,” defined as those who held troves of data in their heads, are less valuable. Whatever information they possess about a particular topic is dwarfed by what’s freely available online.

Provide More Value to Build Your Personal Brand

Provide More Value to Build Your Personal Brand

Ever wonder why some writers get all the attention online? Their posts get shared, their personal brands grow, their email lists swell, and their fortunes rise as their content receives an outsized share of eyeballs.

It’s easy to dismiss their success as luck, by concluding that it resulted from a post going viral (as if hitting “Publish” is the same as pulling the lever on a slot machine), or connections with influencers that others don’t have. Meanwhile, we keep publishing but never gain traction. We preach to the choir of a stagnant email list and collect a few random likes and shares on LinkedIn. As our progress stalls so does our output. Before long, we conclude this “content thing” isn’t worth the time and we go back to billing hours and researching the next marketing trend to chase.

Your Personal Brand is Your Story

Your Personal Brand is Your Story

There’s no great dictionary definition of what a personal brand is. One of the most often cited colloquial definitions is from Jeff Bezos. The point Bezos is making is that a personal brand is a story.

“Your brand is what people say about you when you’re not in the room.”

In other words, your personal brand is impacted and shaped by everything you do – and don’t do – to put your best foot forward. If clients are going to buy from you, they need to understand who you are, what you stand for and the value you bring to the table.

Sure, some clients buy sight unseen, but in most lawyers’ experiences those are not the best type of clients. The most meaningful, satisfying, and profitable engagements typically come from situations where clients come to you for a very specific reason. They know who you are, have done their due diligence, and oftentimes have received a referral from someone they trust.

There’s strong alignment between what they need and what you offer.